RUCAL faculty and students are currently collaborating on the following projects:

 

Over-exposed Self-correction

In bringing to the interactional surface the work it takes to design a turn, self-repairs provide evidence for the normative character of constructing social actions (Jefferson, 1974, 1987; Schegloff, Jefferson, & Sacks, 1977). In doing self-repair, the speaker breaks the progressivity of the turn at talk, thereby exposing a bit of talk as having been inadequate in some way. However, the degree to which an error is exposed (or not) varies. In this project, we analyze a type of self-initiated self-repair in which speakers draw attention to their error in the course of correcting it. In producing such “over-exposed” corrections, speakers not only repair an inapposite formulation, but also repeat and/or comment on the trouble source, thereby further halting the progressivity of the turn. Drawing on a large and diverse corpus of talk-in-interaction in English, we argue that in over-exposing the correction, speakers highlight their accountability for the error in the service of context-specific remedial identity work (cf. Goffman, 1959).

Investigators (alphabetical): Galina Bolden, Alexa Hepburn, Jenny Mandelbaum, Lisa Mikesell, Song Hee Park, Jonathan Potter, Aleksandr Shirokov, Wan Wei, Kaicheng Zhan

Conference presentations:

  • Wei, W., Park, S.H., Zhan, K., Bolden, G., Hepburn, A., Mandelbaum, J., Mikesell, L. & Potter J. (2019). Over-exposed Self-correction. Paper presented at the 9th Meeting of the Language and Social Interaction (LANSI) Working Group, Teachers College, New York City, NY.
  • Zhan, K., Wei, W., Park, S.H., Bolden, G., Hepburn, A., Mandelbaum, J., Mikesell, L. & Potter J. (2019). Over-exposed Self-correction. Paper presented at the 2019 Annual conference of the National Communication Association, Baltimore, MD.

 

The gratitude opportunity space

This project examines the use of expressions of gratitude (e.g. “thank you”) in conversation to demonstrate that the precise timing of gratitude expressions has implications for coordinating social actions and managing relationships. We introduce the concept of the gratitude opportunity space, a normative time for expressing gratitude. Our analysis of sequences involving a provision of assistance via an object pass identifies three phases within the gratitude opportunity space (pre-delivery, on-delivery, and post-delivery) and examines distinct social actions gratitude expressions accomplish within and outside the gratitude opportunity space. Additionally, we explore expressions of gratitude in other social activities (such as gift-giving) and show that the gratitude opportunity space is sensitive not only to the affordances of the physical environment, but also to the turn-by-turn organization of talk, the organization of activities, and participants’ interactional histories.

Investigators (alphabetical): Galina Bolden, Darcey deSouza, Alexa Hepburn, Jenny Mandelbaum, Lisa Mikesell, Song Hee Park, Jonathan Potter, Aleksandr Shirokov, Wan Wei, Kaicheng Zhan

Publication: under development

Conference presentations:

  • Park, S.H., Searles, D., Wei, W., Zhan, K., Bolden, G., Hepburn, A., Mandelbaum, J., Mikesell, L., & Potter, J. (2018) Gratitude in recruitment sequences. Paper presented at the 2018 Annual conference of the National Communication Association, Salt Lake City, UT.
  • Park, S.H., Zhan, K., Wei, W., Searles, D., Potter, J., Mikesell, L., Mandelbaum, J., Hepburn, A. & Bolden, G. (2018) Gratitude in recruitment sequences. Paper presented at the 8th Meeting of the Language and Social Interaction (LANSI) Working Group, Teachers College, New York City, NY.
  • Zhan, K., Wei, W., Searles, D., Potter, J., Park, S.H., Mikesell, L., Mandelbaum, J., Hepburn, A. & Bolden, G. (2018) Gratitude in recruitment sequences. Paper presented at the 5th International Conference on Conversation Analysis, Loughborough, UK.

 

Responding with “I know” in English conversation

An investigation of the use of I know as a responding action. The main finding is that it claims to accept the grounds of the initiating action but either resists that action as unnecessary or endorses it, depending on the epistemic environment created by the initiating action. First, in responding to actions that presume an unknowing addressee (e.g., correcting, advising), speakers deploy I know to resist the action as unnecessary while accepting its grounds. Second, in responding to actions that presume a knowing addressee (e.g., some assessments), speakers use I know to endorse the action, claiming an independently reached agreement (in this way, doing “being on the same page”). Data are in American and British English.

Student investigators (alphabetical): Alexa Bolaños, Stephen DiDomenico, Darcey Searles, Wan Wei

Faculty investigators (alphabetical): Beth Angell, Galina Bolden, Jenny Mandelbaum, Lisa Mikesell, Jeffrey Robinson, Tanya Romaniuk

Publication: Mikesell, L., Bolden, G. B., Mandelbaum, J., Robinson, J. D., Romaniuk, T., Bolaños-Carpio, A., Searles, D., Wei, W., DiDomenico, S. M., & Angell, B. (2017). At the Intersection of Epistemics and Action: Responding with I Know. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 50(3), 268–285. https://doi.org/10.1080/08351813.2017.1340711

Conference presentations:

  • Bolaños, A., DiDomenico, S., Searles, D., Wei, W., Angell, B., Bolden, G., Mandelbaum, J., Mikesell, L., Robinson, J., & Romaniuk, T. (2014). At the Intersection of Epistemics and Agreement: Responding with “I know.” Paper presented at the 2014 Annual conference of the National Communication Association, Chicago, IL.
  • Romaniuk, T., Bolaños, A., DiDomenico, S., Searles, D., Wei, W., Angell, B., Bolden, G., Mandelbaum, J., Mikesell, L. & Robinson, J. (2015). “I know” what you mean: Agreement and epistemics in action. Paper presented at the 14th International Pragmatics Association Conference, Antwerp, Belgium.

 

Co-remembering activities in English and Russian conversation

Memory is a central epistemic resource, yet the interactional organization of shared remembering is largely unexplored. Drawing on a large corpus of video- and audio-recorded interactions in English and Russian, we examine a collection of over 50 cases in which participants are engaged in the activity of co-remembering. We show that memory formulations are commonly used as an evidential method to legitimize or support a claim or point of view in contexts of challenges, objections, disagreements, skepticism, resistance and when alternative positions are on the floor. Our study indicates that in deploying memory formulations, interactants rely on the robust character of excavatable shared past experiences to provide an upgraded epistemic claim to support a contentious stance toward an alternative position.

Investigators: Galina Bolden, Jenny Mandelbaum, and undergraduate Aresty students.

Publication: Bolden, G. B., & Mandelbaum, J. (2017). The use of conversational co-remembering to corroborate contentious claims. Discourse Studies, 19(1), 3–29. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461445616683593

 

Doing being family – Enacting and constructing “family” through interaction

Investigators: Jenny Mandelbaum, Stephen DiDomenico, Darcey Searles, Wan Wei, and undergraduate Aresty students

 

Interactions between people suffering from severe mental illnesses and their medical and social service providers

Investigators: Beth Angell, Galina Bolden, Alexa Hepburn.

Publications:

 

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Aresty students Esti Mellul and Betsy Chao, working with Jenny Mandelbaum, Darcey Searles and Wan Wei, present their poster “Doing being family”
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Aresty students Eleonora Zaitseva and Ziyodakhon Abdujabborova, working with Galina Bolden, present their poster “Co-remembering activities in Russian conversation”